Odgen IS OURS!

The Lady Knights beat rival Mission hills and not only continued our solid undefeated season but earned the coveted Ogden trophy! KEEP IT UP GIRLS!! 

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Daniel McKell
The Importance of a Proper Warm-Up & Recovery
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Youth Soccer Players: Advice from Adam Schauer on Warm Up and Recovery for Top Performance

Adam Schauer has his BS is Exercise Science, he is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and is FMS Functional Movement Systems certified and is the Speed & Conditioning Coach at San Diego Surf SC.

Summer is finally upon us, and the time for camps, training, and tournaments has finally arrived. With the youth soccer tournament season kicking off and Manchester City America’s Cup happening this Memorial Day Weekend, San Diego Surf SC‘s resident Speed & Conditioning Coach, Adam Schauer, shared some feedback on the extreme importance of a good warmup and recovery, what those ideal routines look like, and the tools to maximize performance.

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Adam Schauer warming up players in May 2016 at SD Surf SC

Diane Scavuzzo: Can you explain the importance of a proper warmup? Most youth soccer players want to skip the warm up and get to playing soccer ….

Adam Schauer: The warm up is important, especially if you want to play well and help avoid injuries.

The ideal warmup gets all of the fascia, muscles, joints, and tendons working in unison while maximizing range of motion in order to facilitate both endurance and explosiveness.

In other words, get every part of your body moving the way it is meant to move!

Diane Scavuzzo: What would the ideal warmup routine look like?

Adam Schauer: Players should start off with a 3-5 minute myofascial tissue release routine, which I usually just call “rolling out.”

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We use GurillaBN Rollers and Styks to get the blood flowing, balance out the major muscle receptors, and elongate the the muscular fascial tissue. Ground rollers are best for the large muscles like quads, calves, hamstrings, glutes, and back. Muscle Sticks and lacrosse balls are used for more focused pressure on specific parts of the large muscles and smaller muscles like the piriformis (hips), soleus (inner calf), and anterior tibialis (shins).
When rolling out, players need to try and find “trigger points”, or specific areas of increased tightness, that can be focused on for slightly longer in order to help relieve pains in joints along the kinetic chain.

Relieving trigger points help to combat overcompensation while performing which is the leading cause of sports injuries!

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It is important to warm up the hamstrings

Next, 5 minutes of light jogging and dynamic movements to take the hips through all planes of motion should be done. These movements include leg swings in multiple directions, kick-outs, and “opening and closing the gates.”

After that, a player should go through more dynamic stretches for 2-3 minutes, concentrating on the major muscle groups that were rolled out, with 3-5 second holds.

Be careful not to hold the stretch for too long — that could cause the muscles and connective tissue to lose elasticity, which affects explosiveness.

Finally, progress to more game specific, ballistic movements like short sprints and changes of direction. In total, this routine should take about 10-12 minutes and should be followed by the soccer-specific technical drills and warmups that will get a player ready for peak performance.

Diane Scavuzzo: After a game has been played, what is the importance of a good recovery routine?

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Adam Schauer: A good recovery routine, or “cool down” is absolutely essentially after any game, but especially important during soccer tournaments or tough weekends — where players can be participating in 4-5 games over a two or three day period.

The main effect of a good cool down is that a player will feel physically better for the next game.

There will be less muscle and joint soreness and increased mobility and range of motion. This last of effect, range of motion, is the MOST important aspect and is what will help most in preventing injury.

Diane Scavuzzo:  What is your suggested recovery routine?

Adam Schauer: Recovery should look very similar to the warmup.

Hip mobilities and dynamic movements are again important, and should be done for about 5 minutes at a slightly slower and more deliberate pace than the warmup. This can be followed by rolling out, for 5-8 minutes this time, going a little slower and deeper than in the warmup, making sure to find, be aware of, and focus on any new trigger points that may have developed during the game.

Static stretching should be done last for about 5 minutes, with 10-30 second holds being ideal. The key here is that while static stretching is important, holding a stretch for too long can cause a muscle or connective tissue to lose elasticity, which can cause a 5-10% reduction in explosion and power output!

The ballisitic movements that are done at the end of the warmup routine are not necessary for a cool down. In all, this routine should take about 15 minutes.

Diane Scavuzzo: You mentioned that you use some tools at Surf to help with these routines. What warmup/recovery tools would you suggest that every player have in their soccer bag?

Adam Schauer: I recommend that every player have a roller, muscle stick, lacrosse ball, and a resistance band with them for both training sessions and games.

For elite players and athletes, regular foam rollers are both too soft and lose their shape too quickly, we use @GurillaBN Rollers and Muscle Styks at Surf because they are the best performance recovery tools I have come across and they are also a local, San Diego-based company.

Resistance bands are used to aid in hip mobility exercises, while Lacrosse balls can help with myofascial release on really tough to reach areas of the the upper back and hips. Both resistance bands and lacrosse balls can be found at any sporting good store.

Diane Scavuzzo: What should players do to stay in top form this summer? 

Adam Schauer: I would love to let all players ages 14 and older know about our College Preparatory Camp that will be happening June 14th-August 4th.

It’s an 8 week strength program geared for all aspects of performance enhancement and injury prevention.

The players will learn new myofascial release techniques, how to increase hip and thoracic spine mobility, and will be taken through a systematic movement prep before each soccer specific strength and conditioning session.

You can find Gurilla Rollers online. Professional soccer player and youth soccer coach Ryan Guy is the co-founder of Gurilla Rollers and designed these products to meet the needs of professional players. The idea was to develop a muscle roller that would outperform anything currently on the market. Want to save money? Use discount code “surfsoccer” at checkout for 10% off your entire order.

- See more at: http://goalnation.com/coach-adam-schauer-interview/#sthash.wC1pp2xw.0HYs2UBO.dpuf

Daniel McKell
THE ROLE OF THE COACH IN YOUTH SPORTS
THE ROLE OF THE COACH IN YOUTH SPORTS  by Angela Hucles | April 16, 2013  According to recent studies, about 35 million children between the ages of 5-18 participate in organized sports.  While playing sports is beneficial for children in terms of physical activity and learning new skills, one great benefit of participation is having a dedicated coach available that is invested in the positive development of children, both on and off the field. Coaches wear many hats, and teaching the sport is just part of holding that title. For many participants a coach will serve as an advisor, mentor, lifeline, or simply as a person to lend an ear and listen.  Any sport participant will have at least one story about a coach who made an impact on her life.  The role that a coach can have on a player’s life is significant in youth development.  The sports field offers a place to develop both as an athlete and individual, and lessons learned on that field will be carried throughout life.  At the youth level, a coach’s role is critical as players rely on them for structure and guidance.  When we say “it takes a village” to raise a child, if that child is involved in sports, coaches are by default a part of that village. Like parents or teachers, coaches can be hugely influential in helping kids learn about themselves, build relationships with others and overcome obstacles.  I’ve participated in sports all of my life, starting at age six, and I remember the coaches for whom I’ve played.  The bond goes beyond the lines of competition and lasts longer than a single season.  Whether I’ve agreed or disagreed with a coaching decision made, I have always taken something away from the experience.   Moreover, the relationships between my parents and my coaches have served as an example of how to communicate effectively as well as showcase the importance of personal responsibility.  With so many children participating in sports, the valuable role of the coach cannot be ignored.  The best way to engage and motivate a child with sports is to show her how to enjoy it and to just let her play.  If I thought about everything I needed to do to become a professional soccer player when I was 8 years old, I don’t know if it actually would have happened.  The reason I played soccer and sports in general, was because I had fun and enjoyed them.  And the reason that I continued to play for over 25 years was because I had the coaches to help me discover the joy in the game.  From the grassroots level to the professional level, the positive impact a coach can have on a child is undeniable. It’s more than wins and losses; it’s about developing a child into a healthy, self-confident adult through the wonderful medium of sport.  Thank you to all coaches that dedicate their time to positively impact the youth of today. You are appreciated.    Angela Hucles   www.ETSLeadershipSeries.com   www.AngelaHucles.com  Twitter: @AngelaHucles  - See more at: http://ussoccerfoundation.org/blog/post/the-role-of-the-coach-in-youth-sports#sthash.dsASVWVn.dpuf

THE ROLE OF THE COACH IN YOUTH SPORTS

by Angela Hucles | April 16, 2013

According to recent studies, about 35 million children between the ages of 5-18 participate in organized sports.  While playing sports is beneficial for children in terms of physical activity and learning new skills, one great benefit of participation is having a dedicated coach available that is invested in the positive development of children, both on and off the field. Coaches wear many hats, and teaching the sport is just part of holding that title. For many participants a coach will serve as an advisor, mentor, lifeline, or simply as a person to lend an ear and listen.

Any sport participant will have at least one story about a coach who made an impact on her life.  The role that a coach can have on a player’s life is significant in youth development.  The sports field offers a place to develop both as an athlete and individual, and lessons learned on that field will be carried throughout life.  At the youth level, a coach’s role is critical as players rely on them for structure and guidance.  When we say “it takes a village” to raise a child, if that child is involved in sports, coaches are by default a part of that village. Like parents or teachers, coaches can be hugely influential in helping kids learn about themselves, build relationships with others and overcome obstacles.

I’ve participated in sports all of my life, starting at age six, and I remember the coaches for whom I’ve played.  The bond goes beyond the lines of competition and lasts longer than a single season.  Whether I’ve agreed or disagreed with a coaching decision made, I have always taken something away from the experience.   Moreover, the relationships between my parents and my coaches have served as an example of how to communicate effectively as well as showcase the importance of personal responsibility.

With so many children participating in sports, the valuable role of the coach cannot be ignored.  The best way to engage and motivate a child with sports is to show her how to enjoy it and to just let her play.  If I thought about everything I needed to do to become a professional soccer player when I was 8 years old, I don’t know if it actually would have happened.  The reason I played soccer and sports in general, was because I had fun and enjoyed them.  And the reason that I continued to play for over 25 years was because I had the coaches to help me discover the joy in the game.

From the grassroots level to the professional level, the positive impact a coach can have on a child is undeniable. It’s more than wins and losses; it’s about developing a child into a healthy, self-confident adult through the wonderful medium of sport.  Thank you to all coaches that dedicate their time to positively impact the youth of today. You are appreciated.


Angela Hucles
www.ETSLeadershipSeries.com
www.AngelaHucles.com
Twitter: @AngelaHucles

- See more at: http://ussoccerfoundation.org/blog/post/the-role-of-the-coach-in-youth-sports#sthash.dsASVWVn.dpuf

Daniel McKell
Identifying when a kid is beating themselves up

It's very important as a coach to tell when a player has a healthy driver for wanting a better personal performance, recognizing moments when not feeling satisfied with one's practice is a great sign of ambition. However, I see a moment often unrecognized when a player is actually being too hard on themselves and turning into a counterproductive mentality, commonly thought of as  "beating themselves up." 

This is the moment when there are minor mistakes made and the player responds by,

  • hitting themselves
  • cursing at themselves
  • self insulting
  • stomping the ground 
  • refusing to participate out of frustration
  • projecting blame onto others
  • overly aggressive

When, as a coach, you see these signs, you can conclude that the players mentality has turned into self sabotage. They are over analyzing every step of the task at hand and they move too slow or even stop in the middle of an activity to ask questions. These are all methods to avoid completing the activity because they are afraid to complete the activity incorrectly. Then once they finally finish the task at hand, the attitude becomes even more depressed very quickly.

Correcting this behavior is done by creating an atmosphere where making mistakes is ok. This will only be done if you the trainer or parent come to the child in a genuine mental state, if you cannot do it, do not bother continuing with the player because they can tell the false energy a mile away. You need to ground your emotions and care before any instruction can be given. Using examples of yourself making mistakes or highlighting when you do make a mistake and showing a light hearted attitude will always work best. Then performing the drill at hand properly after making a mistake will create the beginning of a trusting environment. Use those moments to show how after making mistakes and trying again, you became better.

The next step is to set smaller goals that are easily achievable; break it down to remove the enormity of a mistake. No matter what mistake happens now. it's just a small building within small steps to lead to a bigger accomplishment. This in turn will fill a player's self worth and create a safe to fail system for continued growth with the player.

Remember, you must come to the player as authentic as possible. If you need to remind them of the greats who fail, everyone knows the story of Michael Jordan. Yet, humbling yourself and showing your humanity will always be the best method in reaching into a player and building trust. 

Daniel McKell
The Hooo-rahhh! ...to build toughness

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAU2Rtbr50Y

The Hooo -rahhh is when the kids face each other with their arms on their partner's shoulders. They then have to push the other person until you get them across the marked line. The inspiration came from Sumo wrestling.

The hooo-rahhh came out of necessity within the suburb community of coach in. All the top players in the world, in any sport, have to be mentally and physically tough. Boys and girls need to be "ok" with contact, bruises, scratches and sore muscles.. I'm preparing these kids for the real world, which isn't a bed of roses.

Sports help with with socializing, teamwork, confidence, fitness, fun and learning to deal with adversity.. Every child SHOULD experience losing, being injured and then problem solve it. As imple drill, like The Hoo-rahh, teaches the kids to push hard, fight and if you fall on your face, get your ass back up fast to fight again.

Daniel McKell